Prevent and Treat Common Summertime Stains

Your picture of paradise may include cheeseburgers, soda, ice cream, pizza, and other summertime favorites, but that picture undoubtedly doesn't include spots on your shorts and shirts.  These tips will help you confront the stains of summer. For a care-free stainless summer, bring stained items to us.

French Fries

Treat as a grease stain, like meats.  Wash in hottest water possible.

Pizza

This stain has a little bit of everything, including tannin and fats.  Blot off excess stains and use a mild detergent.

Ice Cream & Popsicles

Use mild detergent.  Chocolate can be especially hard to remove.  Pre-treat it.

Alcoholic Beverages

Alcohol may damage silk or acetate and can disturb dyes.  Blot with water and wash.

Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, & Steaks

Blot the excess of these grease stains and dab with water.  Use a pre-treatment such as "Shout." Launder. Bring drycleanable garments to us.

Lemonade

The acidic lemon juice may cause some dyes to change color.  

Candy Apples

Blot, don't rub.  Should wash out, unless it contains a lot of red dye.

Inside Our Stain Removal Arsenal

Stain removal is something we proudly do very well. There are a number of reasons why we stand a better chance of safely and effectively getting out a difficult stain than most folks can do themselves at home. Here's an inside look at our stain removal arsenal. 

Stain removal is half science and half art, but all timing. The sooner we get a stained garment, the more likely we can remove the stain. Chemistry, knowledge of fibers and fabrics, and following the path of least resistance guide our approach to removing stains. The fewer treatments a stain removal specialist needs to do on a garment the better. That goes for the specialist and the garment! The most powerful tool a stain removal specialist has is a firm understanding of the characteristics and attributes of stains, aided by a set of specialized tools.

Q and A with the Press Gallery

Q: Can jewelry damage garments during wear?

A: Undoubtedly, the answer is yes. Buttons, baubles, and timepieces can damage beautiful smooth satins, plush chenilles, or soft wools. The damage can usually be found along necklines or sleeve cuffs where a necklace or watch was worn. These accessories frequently have rough edges that rub and abrade the fabric. Damage may not become apparent until the item is cleaned. 

Smooth satins are very susceptible to this type of abrasion. Many yarns float on the surface of the fabric, and the jewelry constantly rubs a local area. This weakens the yarn fibers, allowing them to shift or break during cleaning, resulting in a fuzzy or pilled and snagged surface. 

Items made with soft, plush chenille yarn are easily snagged by jewelry or contact with any rough surface, including purse straps, bracelets, backpacks, and desks or chair arms. The chenille yarns snag and pull out from the weave. In very severe cases the short, fuzzy pile fibers fall out of the yarn, and only a sheer net of the base yarns remain. 

Loosely-woven wool made from soft, low-twist yarns may show pilling along lower, front panels that may rub against a rough counter top. Pilling may also occur along the edge of the sleeve hem that has been abraded by a watchband. 

Sweater with Jewellery

Q: What causes button dye stains?

A: Button dye stains are caused when the dyes on a colored button bleed during cleaning or finishing, creating discolorations or stains on the adjacent fabric. Some dyes used on buttons are soluble in drycleaning solvents, due to being improperly set by the manufacturer. During cleaning, the dyes soften and stain the surrounding areas. In other cases, the dyes on the buttons hold up to drycleaning but bleed upon contact with moisture such as is found in steam finishing. Again, the fabric adjacent to the buttons becomes discolored or stained.

Fabric Buttons

Common Sense Rules for Winter Clothing Storage

Now that winter is over, it’s time to store away all those winter clothes until next season. Follow these simple rules to keep your winter fashions looking good season after season.
 

  • Wash and Dryclean everything before storage. Some stains that are now invisible may darken with age. Dirt and food are also invitations to insects.
     
  • Make all necessary repairs—sew sagging hemlines, replace missing buttons, and fix split seams— before cleaning and storing for the season.
     
  • Store all items in a cool, well-ventilated area. Hot attics, damp basements, and garages are to be avoided.
     
  • Store away from natural and artificial light. A cool, dark closet is a good location for storage. Store woolens in cedar chests or other airtight containers.


At The Press Gallery we also offer Muslin Cloth garment bags, Ideal for all your garments to breath and filtering the air for long term safe storage.

Second choices for storage are cloth or canvas bags and cardboard boxes. If you store your garments in a closet, drape a cloth sheet over your clothes to protect them from dust and light. Do not store leathers, furs, and woolens in plastic. Plastic encourages moisture, which can create mildew.
 

  • Pack airtight containers (other than cedar chests) with mothballs suspended above or separate from the clothes—never place mothballs directly on the clothes. Cedar blocks or chips also discourage moths.
     
  • To decrease wrinkles in sweaters, fold them and wrap in white tissue paper before storing. If you hang your sweaters, fold over the cross bar to avoid shoulder stretches. Down, like all winter clothing, should be cleaned (either washed or Drycleaned according to the care label) before storage. Down should be stored loosely to allow for air circulation. 
     
  • Furs should be stored on a well-padded hanger in a cool, dark place, ideally in our Fur storage vault.